Episode 077: Video Woodworkers Skiatook Adventure 2017 Recap

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, Dave Barlow, Jedidiah Schultz, and Dustin Suits!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, Nathan Serviss, and Mike Boehmer for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – Working on the 100 vase, starting a job for Whittier College, Finished a bent laminated leg round table.

Sean – Returned from The Video Woodworkers Skiatook Adventure in OK, demonstrated how to metal leaf and apply a chemical patina (below: silver leaf with liver of sulfur patina; Bowl turned by Shawn Graham).  Made another mini 6 board chest.  Posted the Zeta Table video.

XEATV3Ix.jpg_large

Gave a sample panel to Nick Hinson and he framed it.

Brian – Video on the herringbone benches is live, nearly finished with the walnut bed, worked on the jointer dust collection.

Braxton – Recuperating from the OK trip, and finishing up some tables.

Main Topic – Live events and the fun to be had.  Visit the Video Woodworkers website to more information on the creators who attended the OK event.

Guest Question:

Braxton Wirthlin – Thoughts on the VWW Skiatook, OK event experience.  Check out Braxton on his YouTube channel and his podcast,  Woodturners Anonymous Podcast.

Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

Robby Wright – Gents, In a recent show, you commented about leaving dust collectors
running because you can damage the motors by starting and stopping them too
much. In my experience as a woodworker, industrial electrician and an
electrical contractor, I suggest that you are only partly right. Most dust
collectors that are 2 HP, maybe 3 HP, and smaller have fairly lightweight
impellers on them. They can be started and stopped frequently without an
issue. Dust collectors with heavy impellers, such as the 5 HP units, have a
heavier startup load and shouldn’t be started as frequently. Frequently is
more than more than 15 times an hour.

I have a 2 HP Taiwanese dust collector that I have used for 15 years now. It
is controlled  by a current sensing circuit that turns the dust collector on
and off any time a monitored tool, such as my table saw, bandsaw, etc., is
turned on or off. In the initial stages of a project, it is not unusual to
start and stop both the table saw and dust collector many times in an hour
and it hasn’t damaged anything in the motor in those 15 years.

Remember that the only parts that can be damaged are the starting switch,
capacitor, windings and bearings in a single phase motor. The starting
switch will wear, but that is normal. The capacitor doesn’t normally wear as
it is engaged for only a few seconds unless the starting switch is welded
shut. The bearings aren’t going to be hurt from this type of starting and
stopping, leaving only the heat in the windings to do damage. As long as the
motor doesn’t overheat, you are good to go. For three phase motors, only
heat needs to be worried about.

When starting, the only real load on the motor is the inertia of the
impeller. The load of the air movement doesn’t occur until the impeller
starts to get up to speed. Even with all gates open, the motor is going to
be running at less than full rating if properly designed. I measured my
motor and it only draws about three-fourths of its rated current, even under
maximum load of my dust collection system. The more gates that are closed,
the less load on the system.

By the way, if anyone is interested in a current sensing controller for your
DC, you can find my article on it in Fine Woodworking, Aug, 2000 or the FWW
on Small Shops book by Taunton Press.

Enjoy your show – keep up the good work.

Nick Hinson – I recently broke my mini lathe (and almost died in the process). I want to get a full sized one now. I’m going to have to go used because I don’t have the moolah to get a new full sized one. This means looking up old lathe model numbers and figuring out which one has what I need and if they’re worth the price they’re listed at. The problem is, I’m not sure I know what all features are needed in a full sized lathe since I’m so used to the tiny bench top one I had. What are some must-haves for you guys in a lathe? Anything that isn’t a must but is super useful to have? Also, any of you guys wanna sell a lathe for cheap? 😉 Thanks guys!

Arron Sparrow – Hey guys,
Love your podcast.  This comment is a few weeks old, so please forgive me.  When you were talking about future builds or pieces you would like to build in the future, one of you mentioned a canoe.  I believe you also talked about how much work a cedar strip canoe would be to build.  I am also a dream builder of canoes, and here is one I might start with for the following reasons:
1. It looks good, in that the above the waterline parts are mostly cedar strips.
2. but the below the waterline parts are plywood.
This seems to be a good compromise between good looks and ease of build.
See an example in the following link:

http://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/kayak-kits/mill-creek-16-5-hybrid-tandem-recreational-kayak-kit.html

Keep up the great podcast,
Aaron Sparrow
Stian Johannessen – Hey,
Great podcast you guys, keep up the good work. This is the podcast I look forward to the most during my week.
My question for you guys is, should I now get a cheaper band saw and then see if it works with my workflow, or wait 6-12 months and just buy the better quality one? I have been checking our equivalent of craigslist for the last 4 months, but no good deals there, only overpriced low quality stuff. Been wanting learn how to resaw and use homemade veneer and maybe even use it as a small makeshift mill, as a way to start making my own lumber.P.S:
Since i don’t live in the states, i can’t leave a review there, but here it comes:
The Dusty Life is the nr1 podcast out there, everyone should listen to it. Keep making us laugh and learn- Stian Sørhus

iTunes Reviews

Brian SaidEnough – Dusty Life WHOO WHOOO! – 5 Stars – The best thing since turned wood!  You all give great advice.  Keep it up.
Self Immolation – Fun Listen and Inspiring – 5 stars – Good chemistry and it’s fun to hear the different approaches between the guys.  It’s also interesting to hear about turning, something I’d like to try one day.  It seems I have everything but a lathe in my shop.  My only complaint is the awkward silence and fluidity at times, but I’m also not the one editing it, so I understand that’s a lot of work to clean that up post.  Keep up the good work, guys.
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating and review as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 076: Measuring Success

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, Dave Barlow, and Jedidiah Schultz!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, Nathan Serviss, and Mike Boehmer for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – NEW Lathe, Making tap handles, working on the 100th vase.

 

Sean – Finished the nightstand video and the modern stool and preparing for the VWW event in OK.

Brian – Working on the walnut bed

Brain Benham’s Door Video

Main Topic – How do you measure success in a project?

Guest Question:

Mike Montgomery – Work flow and machine/shop organization.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

Matthew Moore –  Hey guys! First off, I stumbled upon your podcast a couple weeks ago and haven’t been able to stop listening to it since. Keep up the good work.

I have a dilemma that I was hoping for some advice on. I am pretty new to wood working and have been making some cutting boards as well as doing some home projects. So far I have a bunch of hand-me-down stuff from my dad and grandfather which include a Craftsman circular saw, 10” Craftsman single bevel miter saw and some hand planes. I’ve also recently purchased a 13” Delta thickness planer and 6” Pioneer jointer along with some Kreg jigs and a router and table as well as various other tools. For most projects I can get by with what I have however I am a bit of a perfectionist and it kills me when there are tools that could make certain tasks easier and/or more accurate and I don’t have them. So my wife came to me a few days ago and told me that for Father’s Day and my birthday she had enlisted the help of our parents and between them I have $450 to buy some more woodworking tools. I’ve been in the market for a table saw as well as a dust collector and have been scouring Craigslist to try and find something worth buying. Also, my shop is in my basement and is pretty small. 13’ x 12’ at the moment with plans to move one wall back so it will be 13’ x 16’. Which brings me to my questions? Would my money be better spent on a Dust Deputy/Shop Vac type dust collection system rather than a dedicated dust collector and would I be able to do most things with a good track saw rather than spend the money on a table saw that would take up quite a bit of real estate in my shop? I am ripping down sheet goods in my driveway as it is to bring them into my shop through a bulk head so that is where the track saw intrigues me.

Thank you in advance and sorry for being so long winded! Stay dusty my friends!

Cheers!

-Matt

iTunes Reviews

UGWGKM – I like donuts – 5 Stars – Listening to this podcast is like eating an old-fashioned donut and washing it down with a hot cup of coffee.  Except you don’t eat the dusty life, you listen to it.  So I guess the two aren’t anything alike.  Except that I really like both of them, so there’s that.  Anyway, cats can hear in ultrasound.  Now you just learned a fun fact from reading the reviews, imagine what you’d learn from actually listening to the podcast.  So grab a coffee and a donut and subscribe. Meow.
Hdueiaknfhyrb – Thanks Guys! – 5 stars – Fantastic information and great banter!  Keep up the great work!
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating and review as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 075: When Machines Go Down

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, Dave Barlow, and Jedidiah Schultz!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, Nathan Serviss, and Mike Boehmer for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – NEW Lathe, Making tap handles, working on the 100th vase.

Sean – Turned 2 bowls, finishing up the modern stool and preparing for the VWW event in OK.

Brian – Working on the walnut bed

Main Topic – When things go wrong and machines break down.

Guest Question:

Jedidiah Schultz – Suggestions for starting YouTube or a business.  Starter lathe.  Check out Jedidiah on YouTube.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

Rob Berger –  Thanks for the great shows. As a new woodworker, I really enjoy them, as well as each of your YouTube channels.

I had an epiphany as I was listening to your last show about Kyle’s veneered globe dream project: when you buy a globe, buy 3 identical globes and make sure they DON’T have any raised topography. Cut the first one like you’re slicing an orange and use it as a template for your veneer slices. Lay them on the second globe as dry fit testing. Cut the third globe in half (or quarters or whatever you want) and use the inside of it as a negative image caul to apply even pressure to the veneer pieces once glued.

Stay dusty,
-Rob Berger

Johnny Tromboukis –  Hey guys,

In reference to Kyle’s dream build (a super awesome globe!), I may have found a solution to the tricky situation of clamping the veneer glue up. What if you split the globe in half and glue on the veneers to each half in your vacuum bag? Then obviously glue the two domes together to get your sphere.

Hope this helps!

Marcin Szczepanski –  Hey dudes,

Thanks for the awesome podcast.  Appreciate your guys’ relaxed style, constant interaction with your audience and even the occasional f-bomb (and by f, I mean FUCK) Ha!

Two questions: just got commissioned to build a large dining table made of Ash (yep, it’ll be a big Ash table).  The top will be 11’L x 50″W and 2″ thick (total of 92BF).  Having always made things of reclaimed wood, this will be my first hardwood order.  With the size in mind, how much Ash would you order for the top taking into consideration waste?

Secondly, the customer wants a weathered/textured finish where you can run your fingers across the top and feel the grain. Normally, with doug-fir, this can easily be done with a wire wheel to give it that texture.  Any suggestions on how I could accomplish this with Ash?  Do any of you have experience media-blasting wood before to weather it?

Anyways, hope this isn’t too long.  Thanks for any help and keep up the great work.

Marcin (pronounced Mar-sin)

@skiswoodshop

 

iTunes Reviews

Mike Boehmer – Palatable – 5 Stars – If you like enjoyable things, listen.  Listening to this podcast is better than not listening to this podcast.
@chefbearbowls – Great Podcast! – 5 stars – Great balance of personalities and skills and focus.  The more I listen the more I like it.  Should I be worried about that?
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating and review as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 074: Ok in OK

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, and Dave Barlow!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, and Nathan Serviss for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts and hoodies for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – Returned from a 10 day trip to Italy.  Starting on 200 tap handles, and passed 100K subscribers.  Check out that video here.

Sean – Made a 3-step stool, converted the kitchen chairs into benches, started work on a modern stool.

Brian – Absent

Nick Ferry – Preparing for the Video Woodworkers Adventure in Skiatook, OK in a couple weeks.  Check that out here.  Check out Nick’s stuff here.

Main Topic – The Video Woodworkers Skiatook Adventure

Guest Question:

Ryan Hubbard – How do you justify the purchase of a Festool Domino as a hobbyist woodworker?  Check out Ryan’s work on YouTube.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

Jim Rumsey – How do you make a 10′ long table from 8′ boards?

iTunes Reviews

 None…
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating and review as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 073:

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, and Dave Barlow!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, and Nathan Serviss for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts and hoodies for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – Miter video, finishing the table, made another chaos vase, went to Maker Faire.

Sean – Finish on the mantle

Brian –

Main Topic – In over your head.

Guest Question: 

 AJ DeSantis – How do you teach yourself furniture making?  Classes, workshops, reading, etc.?  Follow AJ on Instagram, Twitter, and check out his website.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

David Boardman – Hey guys!

First, love the show, I listen to and from my trips to the lumber yard and hardware store every week!
The freshest thing in my mind to write about was the episode I listened to today which was the Q&A episode.  Someone asked about insurance and since I just went through that process I thought I would let you in on what I have now.  I just moved my shop out of my basement and into a commercial building after working full time out of my basement for a year and part time for two more.  While in the basement I did not carry any insurance on the shop other than homeowners.  I contacted my insurance provider about getting a policy and while they did offer it it wasn’t necessary if all you were interested in was full lose.  This means if say your shop caught on fire and burned your whole home down, the tools would be covered under the umbrella of the amount you had your home insured for.  All I ended up doing was buying extra coverage for my home to cover the added cost of the tools.

Now the coverage for my new shop.  I called around and got a couple quotes but I ended up using Farmers (which is funny as you guys made the farmers slogan sound in the podcast).  They are basically acting as a broker as the actual insurance is through someone else.  The policy I ended up with covers my tools (100k) overkill, the building (100k), faulty building (500k), and myself (100k).  The policy runs $100 a month, which I thought was very reasonable.  The faulty building was a huge bonus as it covers me if I build something and it causes damage to others or their home.

Also to what Haunmade was talking about with the wait list.  I get that all the time.  I have 12 week wait, I lose at least one sell a week because of that wait.  I used to just try and fit people who needed things sooner into the mix but what I found is the people who are in a huge rush don’t appreciate handmade, they are likely just trying to find a style they like cheaper than what they could find elsewhere (like pottery barn and such).  I honestly don’t mind now just saying I’m sorry that’s my wait it is what it is.  I like having a wait list as that is my job security knowing I have 12 weeks to find more work if it slowed.  So what it really boils down to is this, there are two kinds of people it’s better NOT to do business with, people in a rush and people on a tight budget, both will expect more than what they are paying for let the weekend warriors and the Facebook builders build their furniture..
keep up the awesome-sause you guys are putting out!
David

Richard Miller – Hey, gang — love the show!

I live in humid central Florida. A relative who lives in super-dry Las Vegas wants a cutting board. I’m concerned that it’s going to self-destruct when I send it there.
I thought about putting it in the oven for a while before oiling it, but I’m not sure that’s such a hot idea (no pun intended).
Any recommendations?
Thanks,
Richard in Florida
PS: I thought about writing you guys a sonnet as an iTunes review like I did for the Wood Talk guys, but I don’t want Kyle to hate me.

Mike – Hey guys I love the podcast. I am one of few people, at least I assume, listening to the podcast who is not a woodworker, at least not yet. I work for a major insurance carrier and asked around to get some opinions relating to the insurance question you got last week. In the purest and simplest terms Sean is correct, if you run a business out of your home your home owners insurance would not cover equipment, products, or materials associated with your business in the event of a claim. However, there is a fine line between a “hobby” and a “business”. For people like Brian and Kyle they would definitely want business insurance as this is a full time job. Anyone who has filed their business with the state should consider adding business coverage as well. If it is such a small amount that you aren’t claiming the income on your taxes then it’s probably not something to worry about. If you have a claim maybe avoid telling the adjuster about your business or business income, remember it’s a hobby. And as any insurance/safety nerd will tell you, you should verify this with an insurance broker in your area who is familiar with this type of business. Keep the great shows coming.

Mike

iTunes Reviews

 ScooterRon – Great Podcast – 5 stars – Great podcast with awesome information.  Keep up the good work.
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating and review as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 072: Open Line Thursday

 

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, and Dave Barlow!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, and Nathan Serviss for your support on Patreon as well.

New t-shirts and hoodies for sale on the website.  Claim yours now!

What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – Miter video, finishing the table, made another chaos vase, went to Maker Faire.

Sean – Finish on the mantle

 

Brian –

 

Main Topic – In over your head.

Guest Question: 

 AJ DeSantis – How do you teach yourself furniture making?  Classes, workshops, reading, etc.?  Follow AJ on Instagram, Twitter, and check out his website.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

David Boardman – Hey guys!

First, love the show, I listen to and from my trips to the lumber yard and hardware store every week!
The freshest thing in my mind to write about was the episode I listened to today which was the Q&A episode.  Someone asked about insurance and since I just went through that process I thought I would let you in on what I have now.  I just moved my shop out of my basement and into a commercial building after working full time out of my basement for a year and part time for two more.  While in the basement I did not carry any insurance on the shop other than homeowners.  I contacted my insurance provider about getting a policy and while they did offer it it wasn’t necessary if all you were interested in was full lose.  This means if say your shop caught on fire and burned your whole home down, the tools would be covered under the umbrella of the amount you had your home insured for.  All I ended up doing was buying extra coverage for my home to cover the added cost of the tools.

Now the coverage for my new shop.  I called around and got a couple quotes but I ended up using Farmers (which is funny as you guys made the farmers slogan sound in the podcast).  They are basically acting as a broker as the actual insurance is through someone else.  The policy I ended up with covers my tools (100k) overkill, the building (100k), faulty building (500k), and myself (100k).  The policy runs $100 a month, which I thought was very reasonable.  The faulty building was a huge bonus as it covers me if I build something and it causes damage to others or their home.

Also to what Haunmade was talking about with the wait list.  I get that all the time.  I have 12 week wait, I lose at least one sell a week because of that wait.  I used to just try and fit people who needed things sooner into the mix but what I found is the people who are in a huge rush don’t appreciate handmade, they are likely just trying to find a style they like cheaper than what they could find elsewhere (like pottery barn and such).  I honestly don’t mind now just saying I’m sorry that’s my wait it is what it is.  I like having a wait list as that is my job security knowing I have 12 weeks to find more work if it slowed.  So what it really boils down to is this, there are two kinds of people it’s better NOT to do business with, people in a rush and people on a tight budget, both will expect more than what they are paying for let the weekend warriors and the Facebook builders build their furniture..
keep up the awesome-sause you guys are putting out!
David

Richard Miller – Hey, gang — love the show!

I live in humid central Florida. A relative who lives in super-dry Las Vegas wants a cutting board. I’m concerned that it’s going to self-destruct when I send it there.
I thought about putting it in the oven for a while before oiling it, but I’m not sure that’s such a hot idea (no pun intended).
Any recommendations?
Thanks,
Richard in Florida
PS: I thought about writing you guys a sonnet as an iTunes review like I did for the Wood Talk guys, but I don’t want Kyle to hate me.

Mike – Hey guys I love the podcast. I am one of few people, at least I assume, listening to the podcast who is not a woodworker, at least not yet. I work for a major insurance carrier and asked around to get some opinions relating to the insurance question you got last week. In the purest and simplest terms Sean is correct, if you run a business out of your home your home owners insurance would not cover equipment, products, or materials associated with your business in the event of a claim. However, there is a fine line between a “hobby” and a “business”. For people like Brian and Kyle they would definitely want business insurance as this is a full time job. Anyone who has filed their business with the state should consider adding business coverage as well. If it is such a small amount that you aren’t claiming the income on your taxes then it’s probably not something to worry about. If you have a claim maybe avoid telling the adjuster about your business or business income, remember it’s a hobby. And as any insurance/safety nerd will tell you, you should verify this with an insurance broker in your area who is familiar with this type of business. Keep the great shows coming.

Mike

iTunes Reviews

 ScooterRon – Great Podcast – 5 stars – Great podcast with awesome information.  Keep up the good work.
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Check out our individual websites (mccauleysdesign.com, woodbytoth.com, and seanrubino.com), our social media platforms, YouTube channels, subscribe!, and spread the word to friends, family, and coworkers.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.

Episode 071: In Too Deep

We want to thank our top Patrons on Patreon: Jameson Elam, Stu Morrison, Scott McWilliams, Elliot Trent, Ty Moser, New England Woodworking Studio, Glen Vajcner, Adam Zawalich, Nick Hinson, and Dave Barlow!  You too can support the show by purchasing a T-Shirt, donating, or become a monthly patron as well.  If you choose to become a patron you can get the show’s pre-release, a sticker, or other rewards based on the level you choose.

Thanks to Marshall Toy, Scott Haun, Sebastian Ollari, Justin Capogna, Matt Cremona, Nick Carruthers, Robert Bakie, Tim Holiner, Dave Bebee, Brodie Brickey, Modern Builds (Mike Montgomery), Eric Burke, Christopher Pickslay, JM Tosses, Terry Mulligan, Eric Schneider, Joe Pierce, Kyle Walker, Daniel Mendoza, Michael Jeffcoat, Kyle Thomas, Bruce Cooper, Steve Avery, Matthew Vitale, Matt Parker, Alex Garcia, Tim Marquart, Charles Alm, Chris Shanor, Stian Johannessen, Jeff Bull, and Nathan Serviss for your support on Patreon as well.

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What’s Going On In The Shop

Kyle – Finished up the table with the wood skirt and made a couple coffee mugs.

Sean – Applied finish to the mantle, recovered from the flu, had a flood in the house, planted the garden.

AJ4HoPNT.jpg_large

Brian – Finished the doors, starting on some refinish work.

Main Topic – In over your head.

Guest Question: 

 AJ DeSantis – How do you teach yourself furniture making?  Classes, workshops, reading, etc.?  Follow AJ on Instagram, Twitter, and check out his website.

                                                                                                                                                                                                     Listener Questions, Email, and Comments:

David Boardman – Hey guys!

First, love the show, I listen to and from my trips to the lumber yard and hardware store every week!
The freshest thing in my mind to write about was the episode I listened to today which was the Q&A episode.  Someone asked about insurance and since I just went through that process I thought I would let you in on what I have now.  I just moved my shop out of my basement and into a commercial building after working full time out of my basement for a year and part time for two more.  While in the basement I did not carry any insurance on the shop other than homeowners.  I contacted my insurance provider about getting a policy and while they did offer it it wasn’t necessary if all you were interested in was full lose.  This means if say your shop caught on fire and burned your whole home down, the tools would be covered under the umbrella of the amount you had your home insured for.  All I ended up doing was buying extra coverage for my home to cover the added cost of the tools.
Now the coverage for my new shop.  I called around and got a couple quotes but I ended up using Farmers (which is funny as you guys made the farmers slogan sound in the podcast).  They are basically acting as a broker as the actual insurance is through someone else.  The policy I ended up with covers my tools (100k) overkill, the building (100k), faulty building (500k), and myself (100k).  The policy runs $100 a month, which I thought was very reasonable.  The faulty building was a huge bonus as it covers me if I build something and it causes damage to others or their home.

Also to what Haunmade was talking about with the wait list.  I get that all the time.  I have 12 week wait, I lose at least one sell a week because of that wait.  I used to just try and fit people who needed things sooner into the mix but what I found is the people who are in a huge rush don’t appreciate handmade, they are likely just trying to find a style they like cheaper than what they could find elsewhere (like pottery barn and such).  I honestly don’t mind now just saying I’m sorry that’s my wait it is what it is.  I like having a wait list as that is my job security knowing I have 12 weeks to find more work if it slowed.  So what it really boils down to is this, there are two kinds of people it’s better NOT to do business with, people in a rush and people on a tight budget, both will expect more than what they are paying for let the weekend warriors and the Facebook builders build their furniture..
keep up the awesome-sause you guys are putting out!
David
Richard Miller – Hey, gang — love the show!

I live in humid central Florida. A relative who lives in super-dry Las Vegas wants a cutting board. I’m concerned that it’s going to self-destruct when I send it there.
I thought about putting it in the oven for a while before oiling it, but I’m not sure that’s such a hot idea (no pun intended).
Any recommendations?
Thanks,
Richard in Florida
PS: I thought about writing you guys a sonnet as an iTunes review like I did for the Wood Talk guys, but I don’t want Kyle to hate me.
Mike – Hey guys I love the podcast. I am one of few people, at least I assume, listening to the podcast who is not a woodworker, at least not yet. I work for a major insurance carrier and asked around to get some opinions relating to the insurance question you got last week. In the purest and simplest terms Sean is correct, if you run a business out of your home your home owners insurance would not cover equipment, products, or materials associated with your business in the event of a claim. However, there is a fine line between a “hobby” and a “business”. For people like Brian and Kyle they would definitely want business insurance as this is a full time job. Anyone who has filed their business with the state should consider adding business coverage as well. If it is such a small amount that you aren’t claiming the income on your taxes then it’s probably not something to worry about. If you have a claim maybe avoid telling the adjuster about your business or business income, remember it’s a hobby. And as any insurance/safety nerd will tell you, you should verify this with an insurance broker in your area who is familiar with this type of business. Keep the great shows coming.

Mike

iTunes Reviews

 ScooterRon – Great Podcast – 5 stars – Great podcast with awesome information.  Keep up the good work.
If you have comments, questions, or suggested topics for future shows you can email us at contact@thedustylife.com.  Follow the show on Twitter and Instagram @thedustylife. You can support the show by purchasing some merchandise, clicking the donate button for a one-time donation, or by becoming a monthly patron to help us keep this bus rolling.

Check out our individual websites (mccauleysdesign.com, woodbytoth.com, and seanrubino.com), our social media platforms, YouTube channels, subscribe!, and spread the word to friends, family, and coworkers.

Also, consider subscribing to The Dusty Life Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, Stitcher, or the click the RSS on our homepage at thedustylife.com and please leave us a rating as it helps climb the ever growing podcast charts.